Please read the attached article and then answer the questions below.Suppose you are hired to conduc

Please read the attached article and then answer the questions below.Suppose you are hired to conduc

Please read the attached article and then answer the questions below.Suppose you are hired to conduct marketing research for a wine company. They ask you to writeup a research plan for designing and conducting an EXPERIMENT to determine the price thatthey should charge for a new wine that they are introducing to the market using the same methodas the one in the article.Your first assignment is to explain to them how the researchers in the attached article conductedtheir experiment. To do this, please answer the following questions:1. State the research problem or question.2. State the hypotheses: State a null Hypothesis (H0) (which you will reject) and then anH1.3. Identify the Independent and Dependent variables in the article. Can you think of anyother Dependent Variables that the researcher could have measured?4. How were they measured here?5. Are there any extraneous variables that could have affected the results?6. Did they use a with-in, or between subject design? Why do you think they chose thatmethod?7. Briefly explain what each individual participating in the experiment had to do.8. In the article, what kind of sample did the researchers use by asking 20 friends toparticipate in a taste test?9. Do you think you can generalize the results from the study? Why/Why Not?10. If you were the one conducting the study, would you do anything different? Explain.Raising prices enhances wine salesBy RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, AP Science WriterApparently, raising the price really does make the wine taste better. At least that seems to be theresult of a taste test. The part of the brain that reacts to a pleasant experience responded morestrongly to pricey wines than cheap ones — even when tasters were given the same vintage indisguise.Antonio Rangel and colleagues at California Institute of Technology thought the perception thathigher price means higher quality could influence people, so they decided to test the idea.They asked 20 friends to sample wine while undergoing functional MRIs of their brain activity.The subjects were told they were tasting five different Cabernet Sauvignons sold at differentprices.However, there were actually only three wines sampled, two being offered twice, marked withdifferent prices.A $90 wine was provided marked with its real price and again marked $10, while another waspresented at its real price of $5 and also marked $45.The testers’ brains showed more pleasure at the higher price than the lower one, even for the samewine, Rangel reports in this week’s online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences.In other words, changes in the price of the wine changed the actual pleasure experienced by thedrinkers, the researchers reported.On the other hand, when tasters didn’t know any price comparisons, they rated the $5 wine asbetter than any of the others sampled.”We were shocked,” Rangel said in a telephone interview. “I think it was because the flavor wasstronger and our subjects were not very experienced.”He added that wine professionals would probably be able to differentiate the better wine — “onewould hope.””Our results suggest that the brain might compute experienced pleasantness in a much moresophisticated manner that involves integrating the actual sensory properties of the substance beingconsumed with the expectations about how good it should be,” the researchers reported.The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Gordon and Betty MooreFoundation.

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